androhanwillanswer

I love books of all kinds, whether it's my Criminal Law Textbook (kind of...), my favourite Children's book of all time or the YA book I just picked up :P
The Prince - Kiera Cass

Honestly, before starting The Selection series I was well aware of the negativity surrounding it based on themes of sexism.

 

When I read the series however, I thought that this was just a reflection of a patriarchal dystopian society where no one had a choice and that the Prince himself was not sexist. I really believed that Kiera Cass was just trying to show a world where life was unfair and that she did not intend any sexism whatsoever.

 

Until I read The Prince.

 

With this novella we get some insight into Maxon's mind and his views on the situation. As I said above, I thought he was a nice, nonsexist and non-shallow guy. But here are some quote to prove otherwise:

 

"And that was how the Selection did its first act in my favor: if I had her here, at least I had the chance to try"

I thought Maxon had allowed America to stay on the basis that she needed money and that he respected her being unable to commit to him... I guess not.

 

“You mean you need the money?”

“Yes.” At least she had the decency to be ashamed of it. 

And why should she be ashamed?? Because she is a victim of a class structure that his ancestry created? There is no shamefulness in needing or wanting money to survive.

 

"This girl"

- Maxon constantly refers to America as 'This girl' never using her name in his thoughts

 

"It felt like she played with the ruffles on her dress for hours while I waited for her to answer, and I sat there convincing myself that it was only because she didn’t want to seem too eager.

“You are very kind, Your Majesty.” Yes. “And attractive.” Yes! “And thoughtful.” YES"

- I'm not sure I really need to say anything here. He basically just wants her to automatically have feelings for him without any real interaction and without him having any feelings for her.

 

" She was probably the sexiest candidate, and I certainly wouldn’t hold that against her."

 

"She nodded and curtsied before she went to get the girl beside her, who I recognized immediately as Celeste Newsome. It would take a dim man indeed to forget that face"

- Alright she's pretty but why would you have to be dim to forget her?

 

"Lyssa jumped out at me, but not in a good way. Unless she had a winning personality, she wasn’t even in the running. Maybe that was a bit shallow, but was it so bad that I wanted someone attractive?"

- To me this says that if someone is beautiful but has a terrible personality, Maxon won't mind.

 

"What made her smile so brightly, then? Was it me? Had whatever she felt for me that day passed?"

- No Maxon, it actually has nothing to do with you. You know, people have lives and they like to focus on other things.

Those are just a few of the things that really irked me with this novella. A part of me wishes that I hadn't read it and that I'd stayed in my naive mindset that the book series was just about what was wrong with society and it was making the best of it. But of course it's better to know and to feel disappointed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SPOILER ALERT!

Everything, Everything

Everything, Everything - Nicola Yoon Sounds like Bubble Boy to me

Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen

Letters to Alice on First Reading Jane Austen - Fay Weldon

1.5 stars

 

My issues with this book are many in number.

 

In fact I have heard it said (although I'm not sure if true) that Fay Weldon did not actually intend for this book to get published.

 

If that is the case, I can certainly see why.

 

I usually enjoy epistolary novels however, with Letters to Alice I found the content dry and difficult to navigate. I feel like I really didn't get much out of the book (this may be biased because it was a In-Class text for my final school exams). But honestly, all I remember is that one phrase about Alice's Black and Blue hair plus all of that information about her affair with a lecturer. In regards to the discussion of Jane Austen and her times, I cannot recall anything (save for the Prostitute statistics).

 

Although thin, it took me a very very long time to read this book as I simply did not enjoy it.

Power of Three

Power of Three - Diana Wynne Jones This book is incredible!!
I love it so much. The plot, the writing, characters, development!!
There's nothing I can flaw here.

Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging

Angus, Thongs and Full-Frontal Snogging - Louise Rennison This book never fails to make me laugh.
Even when I just pick it up to read a page.
Georgia, though she may not exactly be a likeable character, is quite funny.
She only thinks of clothes and boys.
Speaking of which, her goal and mission in this book is to entice Robbie the lead singer of a new band. She enlists the help of the Ace Gang especially Jaz who has her sight set on Tom, Robbie's younger brother.

Uglies

Uglies - Scott Westerfeld Very original.
I thought it was very slow at the beginning that's the only reason I gave it a four rather than a five.
I still loved it and I recommend it to all.

The Book Thief

The Book Thief - Markus Zusak I have only ever read two books tat made me cry and only one that made me tear up.
This book made me cry
At the end
:(
That just shows how beautifully it was written and how attached I grew to the characters.
I love this book and I think everyone should read it.

Clockwork Angel

Clockwork Angel - Cassandra Clare Wow.
And I thought Cassandra Clare couldn't get any better.
The era it is set in adds to the appeal, for me anyway.
I found myself sympathising with Tessa.
I loved it and I loved the sequel.
I can't wait for more.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe - C.S. Lewis :)
I have read this about a million times.
It never gets old.
I love it so much.
Such a wonderful book with great meaning.
Its hard to find books that actually mean something worthwhile.
But this one does.
:)

The Iron King

The Iron King - Julie Kagawa Loved it!
Really, really loved it.
I really enjoyed it though it wasn't what I would call the most original idea.
I liked the characters although Meghan was quite shallow at the beginning.
She developed well at the end of The Iron Queen.
:)

The Hunger Games

The Hunger Games - Suzanne  Collins I can see what all the hype is about.
Very well written and highly intriguing.
It's amazing how Suzanne Collins created this dystopian future in her mind.
Wow.

The Iron Queen

The Iron Queen - Julie Kagawa So wonderful.
Quite sad at the end but there was alot of character development.
Kagawa did a wonderful job with this.

Twilight

Twilight - Stephenie Meyer, Stephenie Meyer *Shudder*
I'm sorry but sparkly vampires really?
I get why some people like it with the wonderful romance and stuff
But really what exactly are the life lessons here?
If you love someone, don't kill them.
Thanks Stephenie Meyer but I think I knew that already.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone - J.K. Rowling, Mary GrandPré The beginning of possibly the best journey ever.
What can I say?
It's just J.K. Rowling being brilliant, as always.

I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You

I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You - Ally Carter I loved this book!
I read it awhile ago so my memory of it is a little rusty.
Its a spy love story and if you ask me, that's really cool.
There wasn't too much drama, so it was a nice light read.

Hush, Hush

Hush, Hush - Becca Fitzpatrick Meh.
Patch is not a name I could take seriously.
When I read the blurb I thought 'Well maybe he's a nice kid who has patched up pants'
No. He is a 'bad boy'
Its like calling a 'bad boy' Spot or Lucky or even Mittens.
'Oh well' I thought and trudged through.
Nora is soo boring.
She really is.
I don't see why all of these fallen angels fall in love with such boring people.
He should of killed her when he had the chance.

Currently reading

Hiroshima (Magnum Collection)
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